The “Maker” Movement to Learn, Live and Share: A Guide Now Available

In spring 2022, unconference (edcamp-style) events on facilitating learning in makerspaces, Fab Labs and creative labs were held virtually. More than 80 people actively contributed to the discussions. A practical guide summarizing the exchanges and offering keys to anyone wishing to create a creative laboratory has just been published. The PDF version is offered exclusively on the École branchée website.

(English version to follow…)

The Makerspaces for Learning, Living & Sharing guide is currently only available in English. The French version will be revealed later this spring. Since the majority of the Unconferences discussions took place in English, it was faster to write the first version in English. Most of the participants were from Quebec, but as the events unfolded and were shared online, new participants joined from other Canadian provinces, the United States, Great Britain and Africa.

Spring 2022 events were organized under the leadership of Ann-Louise Davidson (Concordia University), Nadia Naffi (Laval University) with the participation of three students: Nathalie Duponsel, Houda Jawhar and Geneviève Lamarche. The guide was designed by Don Undeen, also a student.

A total of seven events took place as part of a collaboration between Concordia University’s Innovation Laboratory, the Musée de la civilization de Québec and the Milieux Institute for Art, Culture and Technology.

The following topics were discussed:

  1. Learning from COVID-19, what to do when makerspaces* are closed
  2. Create a network between makerspaces
  3. Preparing makerspace facilitators
  4. Community engagement and the life cycle of makerspaces
  5. The “Maker” movement in formal educational settings
  6. “Maker” set

Bilingual podcasts had been created upstream of each of the themes and are still available on the project website.

A practical guide for everyone

In order to keep track of the exchanges and convey the knowledge shared during the events to as many people as possible, the research team worked on the design of a “Playbook”, a practical guide of around one hundred pages, which wants to be accessible to everyone .

Each episode is presented in a question-and-answer format and offers examples, testimonials, checklists and very concrete ideas that can be easily picked up by anyone who wants to create a makerspace, a FabLab or an open creative space.

Among the questions:

  • What skills do makerspace facilitators need?
  • How do you promote your makerspace in the community?
  • How can I as a teacher prepare to experience the makerspace with my students?
  • What should a maker kit contain?

Each section also contains spaces with planning elements that the reader can fill in to fuel their reflection as they go through the guide. This can be read from page to page. The reader also has the option of flipping from one section to another according to his interests.

This project was made possible thanks to the support of a Connections grant from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada and the collaboration of the Musée de la civilization (Quebec).

* The project group chose to keep the terms ‘makers’ and ‘makerspaces’ in French, as the terms ‘creative laboratory’ and ‘users of creative laboratories’ do not represent the creative spirit well. This refers more to the manufacturing aspect of the “maker” movement.

Download “Playbook”

“Makerspaces for Learning, Living & Sharing”

French version, coming in May 2023


During winter 2022, the Education Makers research team held virtual unconference events (edcamp style) on facilitating learning in makerspaces, Fab Labs and creative labs. Over 80 people actively contributed to the discussions. A practical guide summarizing the discussions and providing tips for anyone looking to maintain, revive or launch a makerspace has just been released. The PDF version is available exclusively on the École branchée website.

The playbook “Makerspaces for Learning, Living & Sharing” is currently only available in English. The French version will be published later this spring. As most discussions at Unconferences took place in English, it was faster to write the first version in English. Most of the participants were from Quebec, but as the events unfolded and were shared online, new participants joined from other Canadian provinces, the United States, Great Britain and Africa.

The Winter 2022 events were organized under the leadership of Ann-Louise Davidson (Concordia University), Nadia Naffi (Laval University) with the participation of three students: Nathalie Duponsel, Houda Jawhar and Geneviève Lamarche. The guide was designed by Don Undeen, also a student.

Seven events took place as part of a collaboration between Concordia University’s Innovation Lab, the Musée de la civilization de Québec and the Milieux Institute for Art, Culture and Technology.

The following topics were discussed:

  • COVID-19 learning what to do when makerspaces are closed
  • Creation of a network of makerspaces
  • Preparing makerspace facilitators
  • Community engagement and makerspace sustainability
  • Making in formal education
  • Maker kit

Bilingual podcasts were created in advance for each theme and are still available on the project website.

A practical guide for everyone

In order to keep track of the discussions and disseminate the knowledge shared during the events to as many people as possible, the research team worked on the design of a “Playbook”, a practical guide of about 100 pages to be freely available. for all.

Each episode is presented in a question-and-answer format and offers examples, testimonials, checklists, and very concrete ideas that can be easily picked up by anyone interested in creating a makerspace, FabLab, or open creative space.

Among the questions:

  • What skills are required of makerspace facilitators?
  • How do I get the word out about my makerspace in the community?
  • How can I as a teacher prepare to experience the makerspace with my students?
  • What should a makerspace kit contain?

Each section also includes spaces with planning elements that the reader can fill in on their own to fuel their thinking as they go through the guide. The guide can be read from page to page. The reader can also flip from one section to another according to their own interests.

This project was made possible with the support of a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada Connections Grant program and the collaboration of the Musée de la civilization (Québec).

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